Safety and efficacy of non-fluoroscopic endoscopic dilatation of gastrointestinal tuberculosis

Safety and efficacy of non-fluoroscopic endoscopic dilatation of gastrointestinal tuberculosis related strictures

Pankaj Kumar, Anuraag Jena, Chhagan Lal Birda, Harjeet Singh, Pankaj Gupta, Kaushal Kishor Prasad, Usha Dutta & Vishal Sharma

Published Feb 2022, in the BMC gastroenterology.


Abstract

Introduction Stricturing gastrointestinal tuberculosis (GITB) may result in persistent symptoms even after antitubercular therapy (ATT) and may require surgical intervention. Data on efficacy and safety of endoscopic dilatation for management GITB related strictures is scarce.

Methods A retrospective analysis of database of patients who underwent endoscopic balloon dilatation for suspected or proven gastrointestinal tuberculosis was performed. The analysis included the site of involvement, technical success, clinical success (response), relapse and requirement of surgery in these patients.

Results Out of 34 patients (47.1% males, mean age 31.9 ± 12.9 years), eventually four patients were diagnosed to have Crohn’s disease while the rest had GITB. Initial technical success was achieved in 30 (88.2%) patients. Initial clinical success was achieved in 28 (82.3%) patients. Median number of dilatation sessions required to obtain symptomatic relief were 2.5 (1–5) per patient. Two patients with initial clinical success had recurrence of symptoms over follow up of 1 year, out of which one patient was managed with repeat endoscopic balloon dilatation successfully. Of 30 patients with technical success, 16 (53.4%) were on ATT when they underwent dilatation while two were in intestinal obstruction. Eventually 7 patients required surgical intervention for various reasons.

Conclusion Non-fluoroscopic endoscopic balloon dilatation is an acceptable and fairly safe modality for symptomatic tuberculous strictures of gastrointestinal tract.

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